How Much Resin Do I Need - Epoxy Resin Calculator (2024)

One of the big questions people always ask when working with epoxy resin is “How much resin do I need?”. This is especially important with epoxy resin because you have to mix up what you need for a project and then have a fixed working time to use what you’ve mixed. Which means ifyou mix too much and don’t have another project prepared, that resin will harden and be wasted. Even worse is when you’re partway through a project and run out of mixed resin. This is especially problematic if you are combining colors or swirling colors together. The resin needs to be a viscous liquid for this to work, so waiting on a new batch of resin can be impossible and ruin a project.Now using our simple Epoxy Calculator on the projects you're going to work on and take some basic measurements!

Epoxy Resin Calculator

Fortunately, there are useful tools to help you avoid miscalculating the amount of resin you will need for a project. Not surprisingly the first tool is an Epoxy Calculator. The epoxy calculator is pretty straightforward. Use a ruler to measure the mold or tray you’ll be filling with resin. Plug those measurements into the calculator and up pops the total amount of resin you need for that object. It’s very important to remember that the volume measurement you get is the TOTAL volume of the resin plus the hardener (Part A + Part B). So, before you measure out your resin, divide that volume in half, and that new number is the amount you need of the resin and the amount you need of hardener.

For example: If I have a mold that’s 1 inch long, 2 inches wide, and a half inch thick (or deep), I plug those measurements into the Epoxy Calculator, and the Epoxy Calculator will tell me I’ll need a total of .54 ounces of mixed resin. That means I’ll need .27 ounces of hardener plus .27 ounces of resin.

The very best way to accurately measure equal parts of resin and hardener, is to use a kitchen or postal scale. I line my scale with wax paper and pour the resin and the hardener in one cup. Then I start mixing immediately.

It’s important to note that different shapes may have the same measurements, but different volumes. An oval that measures 1 inch long, 2 inches wide, and a half inch thick, will need less resin than a rectangle that also measures 1 inch long, 2 inches wide, and a half inch thick. For small objects like pendant molds, I wouldn’t worry about the difference because I’d recommend mixing a little extra resin anyway, and the leftover amount will be very small.

Water Volume Method

However, for larger oval and round molds, or molds that have a very irregular shape, you may need to try another method of figuring out the volume of resin you’ll need. One excellent method is using water as a placeholder for the resin.For this method you will need the mold you want to measure, a measuring cup that you can mix resin in, and water. You may prefer a scale to a measuring cup, but more on that in a minute.

First fill your mold with water to the very top. Then pour that water into the measuring cup. Now read the volume of water in the measuring cup and you know the total amount of resin you need. That’s it. Again, remember that before you measure out your resin, you have to divide that volume in half, and that the new number is the amount you need of the resin and the amount you need of hardener.

Important: If you are going to use your mold or measuring cup for resin right away, make sure that they are totally dry first!

Now, back to the scale. If you want to figure out how much resin you need by weight, not volume, you’ll need a precise kitchen or postal scale. Pour the water from the mold into any container (don’t add in the container weight) and weigh the water. The catch is that resin is denser than water by about 8%. So when you weigh the water from your mold, add another 8%. If you want your calculations to be easier, just round up and add 10%.

How Much Resin Do I Need - Epoxy Resin Calculator (1)

Room for Adjustment

I’ll just add one more piece of advice about determining your project’s resin requirements: Whatever measurement you get, add a little extra. Especially as the resin starts to thicken, it sticks to the inside of your measuring cup, and to the stirring sticks. If you’re dividing the mixed batch into portions to make different colors, you’ll lose a little more resin in this process also.

How Much Resin Do I Need - Epoxy Resin Calculator (2)

And then there are drips. You don’t want to measure so precisely that you can’t afford a few drips.

So the important takeaway here is to calculate how much resin you need as accurately as you can and then add a little extra to the total weight or volume. That way you will always have enough resin, but never much too much.

You are now armed with three great tools to help you figure out how much resin you need to purchase and mix for your projects. The Epoxy Calculator is certainly the easiest, and will work in most circ*mstances, from jewelry molds to resin tables. And when a shape is too irregular to calculate, like a figurine or a sphere, you can use the water volume method to figure out either the volume or the weight of the resin you’ll need. One of these techniques should work for the vast majority of your epoxy resin projects.

How Much Resin Do I Need - Epoxy Resin Calculator (2024)

FAQs

How Much Resin Do I Need - Epoxy Resin Calculator? ›

Including how many gallons, fluid ounces, or milliliters of epoxy you need! If you'd rather do it yourself simply measure the length, width, and height of your pour area by inches, multiply them together (L x W x H), and finally – divide that number by 1.805. This will give you the fluid ounces needed for your pour!

How do I calculate how much epoxy resin I need? ›

To calculate the resin amount, multiply the surface area of your table by the required amount of resin coating. For 1" of resin thickness, you need 576 cubic inches or 319.7 ounces of epoxy resin.

How much does 1 gallon of epoxy resin cover? ›

Most common table top and bar top epoxies provide approximately 12 sq feet per mixed gallon coverage at 1/8″ thickness.

How much epoxy do I need for 1000 square feet? ›

Estimate Amount of Epoxy Needed Per Square Foot

(or 6.4 ounces per sq. ft.) Divide your square footage by 20 to get the gallons required (or multiply by 6.4). You can use 4.5-6.5 ounces for your artwork layer and then do a clear full epoxy flood coat to smooth it out and protect it.

How many ounces of resin per square foot? ›

ArtResin self-levels at about 1/8” when it's on a flat surface so as a general rule, every 4 oz of resin and hardener combined ( 2 oz resin mixed with 2 oz of hardener ) should cover about 1 square foot. To make the math simple, we have a handy Resin Calculator at https://www.artresin.com/calculator.

How do you calculate resin? ›

DIY skills Calculate how much resin you'll need for your pour. The formulation is length × average width × depth of the river pour. The formulation must take place in millimetres. For example, 1200mm (length) × 271mm (width) × 50mm (depth) = 16260000.

What is the formula for epoxy resin? ›

Epoxy resin | C21H25ClO5 | CID 169944 - PubChem.

How many sq ft does 5 gallons of epoxy cover? ›

Coverage Chart for Bar & Table Top Epoxy
GallonsSquare Feet
448
560
672
784
16 more rows

What is the ratio of epoxy to resin? ›

Volume. To achieve the correct 2:1 mix ratio by volume, simply measure out 2 parts resin to 1 part hardener before mixing the components.

What is the difference between resin and epoxy resin? ›

Epoxy coating resin has a more viscous consistency as compared to casting resin. It dries or cures faster than casting resin. Compared to casting resin, epoxy coating resin has relatively shorter processing times. Because the ink layers do not mix, they can be better controlled.

How much epoxy for 400 sq ft? ›

A: Our EPOXYARMOR High Performance Clear Top Coat 1-Gallon Unit will cover 210-400 square feet at 5-7 mils thickness and our High Performance High Wear Urethane 1-Gallon Unit will cover 500 square feet at 3-5 mils thickness.

How much does it cost to epoxy 2000 square feet? ›

Epoxy floor coating costs typically range from $3 to $12 per square foot, but most homeowners will pay around $7.50 on average for professional installation.

How much does a gallon of epoxy cost? ›

How much does epoxy cost? Epoxy resin prices vary widely based on quality and sourcing. On average, you can expect a price between $100 and $150 per gallon. Dealers of so-called "budget brands" may offer an even lower price.

How do you calculate how much epoxy resin you need? ›

If you'd rather do it yourself simply measure the length, width, and height of your pour area by inches, multiply them together (L x W x H), and finally – divide that number by 1.805. This will give you the fluid ounces needed for your pour!

How much will 1 gallon of epoxy cover? ›

One gallon of epoxy is 1/2 gallon resin and 1/2 gallon hardener. When mixed together it will cover approximately 16 sq. ft.

How much does epoxy resin cost per square foot? ›

Epoxy flooring costs $4 to $10 per square foot installed on average, depending on the type and project size. An epoxy floor costs $1,600 to $5,800 for a 2-car garage. Epoxy resin prices are $1 to $5 per square foot for materials and $3 to $5 per square foot for labor.

How much epoxy for 600 square feet? ›

Our 2-Gallon Basecoat Epoxy for Metallic Pearl Effect will cover up to 300 square feet, our 4-Gallon Basecoat Epoxy for Metallic Pearl Effect will cover up to 600 square feet, our 3-Gallon Metallic Pearl Effect Epoxy - Tools Included and 3-Gallon Metallic Pearl Effect Epoxy - No Tools will cover 240 square feet, our ...

How do you calculate epoxy equivalent? ›

The epoxy equivalent weight (EEW) maybe defined as: the number of grams of epoxy resin required to give 1 mole of epoxy groups. The epoxy value is defined as the number of moles of epoxy group per 100g resin.

How do you measure epoxy resin by volume? ›

Measure by volume (with mixing cups)
  1. Determine the amount of mixed material that the application requires (as close as possible). ...
  2. Begin by pouring the epoxy amount your mixture requires into the graduated measuring cup. ...
  3. Next, pour in the required hardener to complete the mixture.
Apr 28, 2021

How much resin and hardener do I need? ›

To achieve the correct 2:1 mix ratio by volume, simply measure out 2 parts resin to 1 part hardener before mixing the components.

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